The purpose of this blog is to share information about current and past criminal events and related subjects; to educate on the basis of psychology, criminology, and sociology; to spread awareness of violent crimes of all types; and to spread information on missing and exploited people (primarily children).

This blog does NOT condone or romanticize criminals or their actions.

© SALVATOREH
justiceandcriminology:


Halloween Murder of Trick-or-Treater Still Unsolved 17 Years Later
When Halloween rolls around each year, what comes to mind is 7-year-old trick-or-treater Tony Bagley. His face and story, a particularly sad and unsolved shooting that happened Halloween night of 1994, are tough to forget.
That’s when Tony, excited and dressed in a skeleton costume as he went door to door trick-or-treating, walked ahead of his sister, aunt and mother when he approached a street corner toward the next house.
At the same time, at 6:15 p.m., a man wearing a hooded sweatsuit ran into the street and opened fire on the Bagley family. Witnesses told investigators that the gunman then jumped into a waiting car and left the area, with the car headlights off.
Tony, a second-grader at Fitzgerald Elementary School, was shot in the head. His 10-year-old sister Shanell Bagley, his mother LaShelle Cooper and an aunt who asked to remain unnamed were also sprayed with the gunfire. Shanell required surgery to remove part of her liver, while the aunt, who was shot in the leg, and mother, who was struck in the chest, were treated and released. Tony was placed on life support and later died.
At face value, the shootings appeared premeditated, targeting the Bagleys. Northtown, as the city is nicknamed, is known as being gang-infested, although police have stopped short of connecting the crimes to gangs.
The only description of the shooter was that he was a 5-foot-8-inch African-American man who was wearing a dark-colored jogging suit. The killer vanished into the night, leaving a cold trail behind him.
Theories varied, with the most prominent being that another family member, not with the Bagleys that night, had been the intended target. That theory, however, never panned out for investigators. Then-Lt. Mike Blackwell with the North Las Vegas Police Department said instead that the shooting may have been retaliation for a drug deal gone bad.
The case was so frustrating for police and the family, because there were no real leads, that police went so far as to call on a psychic for help. Tony’s mother flew to Los Angeles with a detective to talk to the psychic, said the boy’s grandmother, Carolyn Landers.
“The psychic told them where the gun was, in an abandoned building,” Carolyn said. “It seemed good at first. But when police went to the building, there was no gun.”
The Bagley family found new hope when Tony’s story was broadcast four months later on“America’s Most Wanted.”But Ivey Van Allen, a publicist for the program, said afterward: “We didn’t get any calls.”
On the first anniversary of Tony’s death, the late Bob Stupak, a gambling mogul, offered a $100,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of Tony’s killer. Again, no leads came from it.In an odd twist, 3-1/2 years after Tony was shot, his father, Anthony Bagley, in April 1998 was charged and convicted of an unrelated murder, also committed on a street. Today, Anthony Bagley sits in a Nevada State Prison serving out two consecutive life terms. Anthony has never talked to police about whether he knew who shot his son.
Over the years, I’ve written about Tony’s murder several times, hoping to keep the case in the public’s eye. Seventeen years later, according to authorities, the 1994 Halloween murder of young Tony Bagley remains unsolved, and there are no new leads.
[Source]

I study a lot of horrible crimes on my own and on this blog, but whenever a child is murdered and the offender escapes…it feels like a cold failure. Little Tony Bagley’s unsolved murder hurts.

justiceandcriminology:

Halloween Murder of Trick-or-Treater Still Unsolved 17 Years Later

When Halloween rolls around each year, what comes to mind is 7-year-old trick-or-treater Tony Bagley. His face and story, a particularly sad and unsolved shooting that happened Halloween night of 1994, are tough to forget.

That’s when Tony, excited and dressed in a skeleton costume as he went door to door trick-or-treating, walked ahead of his sister, aunt and mother when he approached a street corner toward the next house.

At the same time, at 6:15 p.m., a man wearing a hooded sweatsuit ran into the street and opened fire on the Bagley family. Witnesses told investigators that the gunman then jumped into a waiting car and left the area, with the car headlights off.

Tony, a second-grader at Fitzgerald Elementary School, was shot in the head. His 10-year-old sister Shanell Bagley, his mother LaShelle Cooper and an aunt who asked to remain unnamed were also sprayed with the gunfire. Shanell required surgery to remove part of her liver, while the aunt, who was shot in the leg, and mother, who was struck in the chest, were treated and released. Tony was placed on life support and later died.

At face value, the shootings appeared premeditated, targeting the Bagleys. Northtown, as the city is nicknamed, is known as being gang-infested, although police have stopped short of connecting the crimes to gangs.

The only description of the shooter was that he was a 5-foot-8-inch African-American man who was wearing a dark-colored jogging suit. The killer vanished into the night, leaving a cold trail behind him.

Theories varied, with the most prominent being that another family member, not with the Bagleys that night, had been the intended target. That theory, however, never panned out for investigators. Then-Lt. Mike Blackwell with the North Las Vegas Police Department said instead that the shooting may have been retaliation for a drug deal gone bad.

The case was so frustrating for police and the family, because there were no real leads, that police went so far as to call on a psychic for help. Tony’s mother flew to Los Angeles with a detective to talk to the psychic, said the boy’s grandmother, Carolyn Landers.

“The psychic told them where the gun was, in an abandoned building,” Carolyn said. “It seemed good at first. But when police went to the building, there was no gun.”

The Bagley family found new hope when Tony’s story was broadcast four months later on“America’s Most Wanted.”But Ivey Van Allen, a publicist for the program, said afterward: “We didn’t get any calls.”

On the first anniversary of Tony’s death, the late Bob Stupak, a gambling mogul, offered a $100,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of Tony’s killer. Again, no leads came from it.

In an odd twist, 3-1/2 years after Tony was shot, his father, Anthony Bagley, in April 1998 was charged and convicted of an unrelated murder, also committed on a street. Today, Anthony Bagley sits in a Nevada State Prison serving out two consecutive life terms. Anthony has never talked to police about whether he knew who shot his son.

Over the years, I’ve written about Tony’s murder several times, hoping to keep the case in the public’s eye. Seventeen years later, according to authorities, the 1994 Halloween murder of young Tony Bagley remains unsolved, and there are no new leads.

[Source]

I study a lot of horrible crimes on my own and on this blog, but whenever a child is murdered and the offender escapes…it feels like a cold failure. Little Tony Bagley’s unsolved murder hurts.



Old Navy Safety Fairs this Weekend

For the fifth year in the row, Old Navy is raising money to support our mission. From Sept. 18 – 28, customers who make an in-store donation to NCMEC will receive a coupon good for $5 off a purchase of $35 or more Oct. 2-9.

This Saturday, Sept. 20, Old Navy stores across the U.S. are hosting safety fairs for your family. There will be Child IDs, downloads from NetSmartz Workshop and so much more. See your local store for details.

Learn more at www.oldnavysafety.org.





nightmover:

KIDNAPPED N.H. TEEN SUFFERED “UNSPEAKABLE VIOLENCE”
A New Hampshire teen who vanished for nearly a year was violently abducted by a stranger and “suffered numerous acts of unspeakable violence,” her lawyers said in a statement, as details continue to slowly emerge in a case where investigators have been tight-lipped.
Abigail Hernandez was 14 when she disappeared on her way home from school last year in Conway, N.H., a small tourist town in the northeastern part of the state.
Authorities launched a wide search for the teen and offered rewards. Missing posters went up through the region, but for nine months the only trace of the girl was a single letter she wrote to her mother. She returned home the night of July 20 wearing the same clothes she had on when she disappeared.
A SWAT team arrested Nathaniel Kibby, 34, on July 28 at his home in Gorham, N.H., located about 30 miles from Abigail’s home. The now 15-year-old provided information that led to Kibby’s arrest, including details for a police sketch, prosecutors said at the time.
Kibby pleaded not guilty to a felony charge of kidnapping on July 28, but few other details have been released. He is currently jailed on $1 million bail.
More information and the probable cause statement were originally due to be shared in court this week, but that hearing has been pushed back until September, according to ABC News.
"It is going to be a long process in pursuit of justice for Abby and for Abby to get physically and emotionally stronger," said the statement issued Tuesday by attorneys Michael Coyne, Steven Hyde and Briana Coakley, who are representing the Hernandez family.
The attorneys called her survival nothing short of “miraculous.”
"As the justice system moves forward, and the evidence is revealed, questions about this horrific event will be answered," they said.
Coyne told the Associated Press on Wednesday that he “would expect that there will be further charges consistent with the evidence in the case.”
Kibby’s lawyer, public defender Jesse Friedman, declined to comment on the statement.
A judge recently ordered investigators to leave in place a moible home and a large storage container belonging to Kibby. Prosecutors had sought to haul away the two items and place them in storage. They believe Kibby held Abigail on his property, but it was not clear if they think she was kept inside the structures or was at the trailer park for her entire nine-month disappearance, according to The Boston Globe.
Prosecutors have released few details about the case or said if additional charges will be filed against Kibby.
Debbie Demers, a neighbor of Kibby, previously told NECN.com the suspect had a large, soundproof shipping container behind his mobile home.
"He’s been called crazy Nate. I don’t know too much about him, he’s pretty much a loner," she told the website. "I always told the girls stay away from that trailer. He likes his guns and it was a little shooting range back there."
Wally Corrigan Jr., whose father owns the trailer park, told the website that Kibby often railed against the government.
"I figured he’d be like somebody who would be holding up the town selectmen or something because the taxes went up," he said.
In a July 28 interview on NBC’s Today, Abby’s mother, Zenya Hernandez, said that when her daughter returned home she had “a look in her eyes I’ve never, ever seen before. And that’s something that’s haunting me, and I think will haunt me for the rest of my life.”
Coyne said Abigail is getting professional help, but he declined to discuss details.
Contributing: John Bacon, Michael Winter and the Associated Press
Source: http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/08/13/abigail-hernandez-abduction-teen/14000841/

nightmover:

KIDNAPPED N.H. TEEN SUFFERED “UNSPEAKABLE VIOLENCE”

A New Hampshire teen who vanished for nearly a year was violently abducted by a stranger and “suffered numerous acts of unspeakable violence,” her lawyers said in a statement, as details continue to slowly emerge in a case where investigators have been tight-lipped.

Abigail Hernandez was 14 when she disappeared on her way home from school last year in Conway, N.H., a small tourist town in the northeastern part of the state.

Authorities launched a wide search for the teen and offered rewards. Missing posters went up through the region, but for nine months the only trace of the girl was a single letter she wrote to her mother. She returned home the night of July 20 wearing the same clothes she had on when she disappeared.

A SWAT team arrested Nathaniel Kibby, 34, on July 28 at his home in Gorham, N.H., located about 30 miles from Abigail’s home. The now 15-year-old provided information that led to Kibby’s arrest, including details for a police sketch, prosecutors said at the time.

Kibby pleaded not guilty to a felony charge of kidnapping on July 28, but few other details have been released. He is currently jailed on $1 million bail.

More information and the probable cause statement were originally due to be shared in court this week, but that hearing has been pushed back until September, according to ABC News.

"It is going to be a long process in pursuit of justice for Abby and for Abby to get physically and emotionally stronger," said the statement issued Tuesday by attorneys Michael Coyne, Steven Hyde and Briana Coakley, who are representing the Hernandez family.

The attorneys called her survival nothing short of “miraculous.”

"As the justice system moves forward, and the evidence is revealed, questions about this horrific event will be answered," they said.

Coyne told the Associated Press on Wednesday that he “would expect that there will be further charges consistent with the evidence in the case.”

Kibby’s lawyer, public defender Jesse Friedman, declined to comment on the statement.

A judge recently ordered investigators to leave in place a moible home and a large storage container belonging to Kibby. Prosecutors had sought to haul away the two items and place them in storage. They believe Kibby held Abigail on his property, but it was not clear if they think she was kept inside the structures or was at the trailer park for her entire nine-month disappearance, according to The Boston Globe.

Prosecutors have released few details about the case or said if additional charges will be filed against Kibby.

Debbie Demers, a neighbor of Kibby, previously told NECN.com the suspect had a large, soundproof shipping container behind his mobile home.

"He’s been called crazy Nate. I don’t know too much about him, he’s pretty much a loner," she told the website. "I always told the girls stay away from that trailer. He likes his guns and it was a little shooting range back there."

Wally Corrigan Jr., whose father owns the trailer park, told the website that Kibby often railed against the government.

"I figured he’d be like somebody who would be holding up the town selectmen or something because the taxes went up," he said.

In a July 28 interview on NBC’s Today, Abby’s mother, Zenya Hernandez, said that when her daughter returned home she had “a look in her eyes I’ve never, ever seen before. And that’s something that’s haunting me, and I think will haunt me for the rest of my life.”

Coyne said Abigail is getting professional help, but he declined to discuss details.

Contributing: John Bacon, Michael Winter and the Associated Press

Source: http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/08/13/abigail-hernandez-abduction-teen/14000841/



New age progression released for child missing since 1958 

ncmec:

News articles from November 1958 recount the days after 7-year-old Adele Wells went missing from Flint, Michigan. Search and rescue teams combed the area where she was last seen. Boy scouts, firefighters and volunteers all assisted to try and find this child. Today Adele is 63 years old and still missing.

image

The image on the left shows Adele as a child, the new age-progressed image on the right shows what Adele Wells may look like today.

We have released an age progressed photo of what Adele would look like today. Her family has always held out hope that she was taken by someone and raised as their own child. If you think you may be Adele or have any information about her whereabouts, call 1-800-843-5678. 

image

The Toledo Blade published this short story about Adele in 1958.

Sixty years have passed and the search is still on-going. Adele was last seen leaving her house wearing a blue dress with small animals along the hemline, and a grey cotton coat. View her poster here: http://ow.ly/BCrmx.





Akron man charged with selling Fairlawn girl for sex in Columbus 

COLUMBUS, Ohio — An Akron man is charged with selling a missing Fairlawn girl for sex.

Antonio Sibley, 38, faces charges of sexual exploitation of children and forcing prostitution in U.S. Southern District of Ohio Court.

The grand jury returned the indictment on Thursday. A Columbus human trafficking task force arrested Sibley on July 30.

The 17-year-old girl told investigators that she ran away from her Fairlawn home in April and since worked for Sibley as a prostitute. Sibley posted advertisements selling the girl’s services on Backpage.com, a website where pimps and prostitutes are known to advertise.

The girl told investigators that Sibley set up about five clients per day, according to the document.

A Columbus police human trafficking task force received a tip July 30 from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. An affidavit says several photos of the ad resembled the girl, but the girl’s face was never shown.

The task force set up a sting operation the next day, set up a date to meet the girl and were instructed to go to the Casa Villa Motel in Whitehall, a Columbus suburb.

An officer met with the girl about 3:30 p.m. and arrested her, according to records. The girl then told investigators that Sibley purchased the motel for her to have sex with clients, the document says.

Officers arrested Sibley about 5:45 p.m. at the motel. Officers seized two cellphones from the room, including one that had nude photos of the girl, documents say.

Sibley was most recently convicted in Summit County for a bank robbery. Court records say Sibley robbed a First Merit Bank in December 2003 and stole more than $2,000.

He was sentenced to three years probation. He was also sentenced to one year in prison in 1996 for theft and carrying a handgun.



dance-0f-the-damned:

The contents of Jeffrey Dahmer’s fridge were shocking, (From to bottom):

  1. Jars containing human remains.
  2. At the left top corner you see a skull in a plastic bag.
  3. This photo was not one of his fridge but one of his closet. A bottle of chloroform can be seen next to the two skulls.

Source: Here.



"

Let me tell you a story. The day after Columbine, I was interviewed for the Tom Brokaw news program. The reporter had been assigned a theory and was seeking soundbites to support it. “Wouldn’t you say,” she asked, ‘that killings like this are influenced by violent movies?” No, I said, I wouldn’t say that. “But what about ‘The Basketball Diaries’?” she asked. “Doesn’t that have a scene of a boy walking into a school with a machinegun?”

The obscure 1995 Leonardo DiCaprio movie did indeed have a brief fantasy scene of that nature, I said, but the movie failed at the box office and it’s unlikely the Columbine killers saw it.

The reporter looked disappointed, so I offered her my theory. “Events like this,” I said, “if they are influenced by anything, are influenced by news programs like your own. When an unbalanced kid walks into a school and starts shooting, it becomes a major media event. Cable news drops ordinary programming and goes around the clock with it. The story is assigned a logo and a theme song; these two kids were packaged as the Trench Coat Mafia. The message is clear to other disturbed kids: If I shoot up my school, I can be famous. The TV will talk about nothing else but me. Experts will try to figure out what I was thinking. Kids and teachers at school will see they shouldn’t have messed with me. I’ll go out in a blaze of glory.”

In short, I said, events like Columbine are influenced far less by violent movies than by CNN, “The NBC Nightly News” and other news media, who glorify the killers in the guise of “explaining” them.

The reporter thanked me and turned off the camera. Of course the interview was never used. They found plenty of talking heads to condemn violent movies, and everybody was happy.

"  - Roger Ebert (via pizzaforpresident)



amyleighstrickland: Anyone out there have information/experience with interrogating and arresting a minor? Like, if a 16 year old were suspected in a disappearance, what would be the process/legal red tape in interrogating him and arresting him?

theinformationdump:

Interrogation of a minor works the same way it does with adult suspects: they have all their constitutional rights and have been made aware of their Miranda rights. The only difference is a parent or guardian must be present during any interview. Interrogation can happen either in a police department or outside (hospital room, child’s room, etc).

When a minor is arrested and taken into a police department, they are kept separate from adult offenders at all times. If there are no adults in the booking room (a room where people are placed for processing after being arrested), the child can wait there. Otherwise, they must be moved to another location (usually an office). If they are reasonably suspected of being responsible for a criminal act, they must be placed in a cell or lockable room (regardless of whether the room is locked or not). The suspect can only be held for six hours and must be monitored at all times. If no one can be contacted regarding the care and shelter of the child or the adult refuses custody, the police can submit a request to detain the child for the safety of the child. 

A separate record log is kept for juvenile holdings. Anyone under the age of majority who is detained for any amount of time and any reason must be recorded in this log book. A copy of the log is attached to the case report.

Any minor charged with a crime has their fingerprints and photo taken. When this information is entered into the police database, the record gets a “juvenile” designation. A parent or guardian must be contacted and informed of the whereabouts of the child, the reason for their arrest, and the police’s intentions for further action.

To release the child before a court date, the police issue a summons, a formal complaint, and a promise to appear form, and the child must be released to a parent, guardian, or other appropriate person or agency. If the child is almost at the age of majority, the officer can choose to release them “into his or her own custody,” though the forms are still given to a parent or guardian. If the officer cannot reach a suitable adult authority, the forms are sent to the parent or guardian’s home address.

The officer can also choose to send the child immediately to a juvenile detention center if the crime is a “serious juvenile offense” (see below) or there is already an outstanding warrant or court order for arrest. If this is done, the police will not issue a summons, and processing of the minor is handled by the detention facility.

Of course, depending on the type and severity of the crime (such as murder or gang-related activity), it is possible for the child to be tried and convicted as an adult.

Edit:

ayominho says: In most states it is NOT true that a kid can’t be interrogated without a parent being present. Cops generally have to tell a kid they can consult with their parents before they can question a kid. Check the state laws where your story takes place people. Laws vary.

the-littlest-daisy added: this isn’t true, i was arrested before and i wasn’t read miranda rights, they tricked me into believing i was picking up my stuff they took from my house after they arrested my brother

Offenses that fall under “serious juvenile offense” include:

Read More